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G20 police ripped off amputee’s prosthetic limb, told him to walk before dragging him off

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Of course the cops were yelling that he was resisting arrest – that’s now standard operating procedure. Raise an arm to defend yourself against the crack of a baton or push back even accidentally, and presto, you’ve assaulted an officer. As the G20 weekend and media reports from across the country in recent years make clear, this is about more than just a few bad apples – the barrel of apples is just about rotted through. Of course there must be many honest, hardworking good people on the force but it seems like they’re rapidly becoming a minority. Just look at media reports from across the continent – grandmothers being TASERed for sitting up in bed, women for sitting in the wrong seat at a game, innocent people being dragged out of their homes and beaten, border guards arresting people for asking questions, this is just how the cops roll now. The question is, why? What has happened to our former ‘peace officers’, charged with the honour to serve and protect, now more akin to some sort of dark STASI enforcement arm loosed on the public? There are many cultural forces at play here, but the increasing militarization and corruption of the police in the world we’re told is forever changed ‘post-911′ is but one of the many issues this journal attempts to set in context. Spin the ‘topicgate’ globe to the left of your screen and click a topic to jump in.

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Doug Draper, Niagara at Large
July 5, 2010

John Pruyn wasn’t much in the mood for celebrating Canada Day this year.

How could he be after the way he was treated a few days earlier in Toronto by figures of authority most of us were brought up to respect, our publicly paid-for police forces who are supposed to be there to serve and protect peaceful, law-abiding citizens like him.

The 57-year-old Thorold, Ontario resident — an employee with Revenue Canada and a part-time farmer who lost a leg above his knee following a farming accident 17 years ago — was sitting on the grass at Queen’s Park with his daughter Sarah and two other young people this June 26, during the G20 summit, where he assumed it would be safe.

As it turned out, it was a bad assumption because in came a line of armoured police, into an area the city had promised would be safe for peaceful demonstrations during the summit. They closed right in on John and his daughter and the two others and ordered them to move. Pruyn tried getting up and he fell, and it was all too slow for the police.

As Sarah began pleading with them to give her father a little time and space to get up because he is an amputee, they began kicking and hitting him. One of the police officers used his knee to press Pruyn’s head down so hard on the ground, said Pruyn in an interview this July 4 with Niagara At Large, that his head was still hurting a week later.

Accusing him of resisting arrest, they pulled his walking sticks away from him, tied his hands behind his back and ripped off his prosthetic leg. Then they told him to get up and hop, and when he said he couldn’t, they dragged him across the pavement, tearing skin off his elbows , with his hands still tied behind his back. His glasses were knocked off as they continued to accuse him of resisting arrest and of being a “spitter,” something he said he did not do. They took him to a warehouse and locked him in a steel-mesh cage where his nightmare continued for another 27 hours.

“John’s story is one of the most shocking of the whole (G20 summit) weekend,” said the Ontario New Democratic Party’s justice critic and Niagara area representative Peter Kormos, who has called for a public inquiry into the conduct of security forces during the summit. “He is not a young man and he is an amputee. …. John is not a troublemaker. He is a peacemaker and like most of the people who were arrested, he was never charged with anything , which raises questions about why they were arrested in the first place.”

Pruyn told Niagara At Large that he never was given a reason for his arrest . When he was being kicked and hand-tied, police yelled at him that he was resisting arrest. Then a court officer approached him two hours before his release on Sunday evening, June 27, and told him he should not still be there in that steel -mesh cage. So why were Pruyn and his daughter Sarah, a University of Guelph student, who was locked up somewhere else, detained in a makeshift jails for more than 24 hours, along with many other mostly young people who, so far as he could hear and see, had nothing to do with the smashing of windows and torching of a few police cars by a few hundred so-called ‘Black Bloc’ hooligans that weekend?

Why was Pruyn slammed in a cell without his glasses and artificial limb, with no water to drink in the heat for five hours and only a cement floor to sit and sleep on before his captors finally gave him a wheelchair? Why was he never read his rights or even granted the opportunity to make one phone call to a lawyer or his family — the same rights that would be granted to a notorious criminal like Clifford Olsen or Paul Bernardo?

He never received an answer to these questions and, he said, “I was never told I was charged with anything.” Neither were many of the others who were penned up in that warehouse with him, including one person who was bound to a wheelchair because was paralyzed on one side and begging, over and over again, to go to the washroom before finally wetting his pants.

Pruyn said others in the warehouse begged for a drink of water and younger people made futile pleas to call their parents to at least let them know where they were. In the meantime, Pruyn’s wife, Susan, was frantically trying to find out from the police and others what happened to her husband and daughter. She found out nothing until they were finally released 27 hours after she was supposed to meet back with them at a subway station near Queen’s Park.

So what was this all about and why were John and Sue Pruyn arrested if they were part of the gathering of peaceful demonstrators in the Queen’s Park area? Was their crime to dare to come to Toronto in the first place and join with those who express concerns about the G20 and whether it has any concern at all for the environment, for people living in poverty, for fair access to health care and other issues important to people around the world who fall into the category of ‘have nots’?

Pruyn wonders if the idea of the crackdown was to send a message to the public at large that gatherings of opposition to government policies won’t be tolerated. “That is (Prime Minister Stephen) Harper’s attitude,” he said. “He doesn’t like dissent in his own (party) ranks.”

Kormos said some might respond to the crackdown against the G20 summit demonstrators by saying that they should have stayed home or they should not have been there, or that if they were swept up by the police, they should have nothing to worry about if they did nothing wrong. But that misses the point, he said. It misses the possibility that this was another example of the province and country sliding down a path of clamping down on citizens’ right to gather together and express views that may not be popular with the government of the day.

Kormos stressed again that a public inquiry is needed, not only for those demonstrators arrested and roughed up during the summit, but for those shop owners in Toronto that had their stores vandalized by a horde of hooligans with little apparent presence of police officers to prevent it.

Asked if there was any possibility a few hundred black-clad vandals were allowed to run wild to make the thousands of people there to demonstrate peacefully look badly, Kormos responded; “That’s why we need a public inquiry.”

Susan Pruyn agreed. “ We need a public inquiry for all of the people who went (to Toronto) with good intentions and who ended up suffering that weekend,” she said.

Source | Alternate Coverage | See Also under Police: Release G20 ‘political prisoners’: rights groups | Canada Day: 2,000 protest G20 summit arrests | Civil liberties association to sue police on behalf of G20 arrestees | Police accused of displaying fake G20 weapons | Four detained journalists file complaints of assault, sexual threats against G20 police | Inside the G20 Eastern Avenue Detention Centre | Toronto Police Lied: No five-metre rule existed in G20 security fence law | The G20: Brutal spectacle failed a city and its people | The G20’s ignominious end: Panic, outrage as police detain hundreds for hours in pouring rain | National Post photographers arrested, spend night in G20 detention camp | Peaceful Eastern Ave jail solidarity action attacked by Toronto police | Police Raid U of T Student Union for Hosting G20 Protesters | Guardian journalist beaten, arrested at peaceful G20 protest on Esplanade | Pre-dawn raids in Toronto homes result in four arrests | Mass sit-in in Egypt over police killing | G20 law gives police sweeping powers to arrest people | Judge Greenlights Sonic Cannons for Use on Civilian Protest, Further Court Tests Slated for Fall | Collingwood man dies after being tasered by police in group home | CP Reporter: How I was detained by G8 security | G20: Activists Arrested, Others Denied Entry into Canada | Toronto no longer feels like home | Police stop car containing ‘weapons’ near G20 summit | G20: Canada’s billion-dollar summit mystery | Police TASER Grandmother in Bed | UK: Filmmaker Captures Absurdity, Empty Threats Of Police Terror Stop Laws | Sacco and Vanzetti in Ottawa: How Media and Police are Politicizing the RBC Arson Case | G20 security prepared for any threat, at any cost | Peel cop guilty in fake cocaine case | G8/G20 Police Fusion Centres Unmasked in Barrie, North Toronto | No legislation, no precedent to limit G20 police powers | Hospitals, medics prepare for G20 injuries and tear gas | Soldiers and secret police: Some in Huntsville ‘getting nervous’ over G8 | G20 traffic fence can be closed at ‘a moment’s notice,’ police say | Police add water cannon to G20 arsenal | Toronto G20 police arsenal includes plastic bullets | Real IRA plot accused entrapped by MI5 rules judge | Special prosecutor named as inquiry blasts ’shameful’ Dziekanski Tasering | Ban G20 summit agents provocateurs: activist groups to PM | RCMP wrong to use Taser on Dziekanski: final Braidwood report | Air India report: American-style security czar needed to end agency turf wars | Russian police seize 100,000 anti-Vladimir Putin books | New RCMP watchdog on a short leash: critics | Rights group files for injunction against G20 ‘sound cannon’ | New RCMP watchdog to have more tools to check complaints about force | RCMP to get new oversight agency | Police use teargas on disgruntled World Cup workers | JTF2 Commandos prepare for G20 with secret night raids, frighten Brockville residents | The drug sting that stung a cop | Toronto G20 weekend: Private security fast-tracked, traffic jams, heavy police presence, but no sonic weapons | World Cup: Street kids rounded up and run out of town | G20 activists accuse CSIS of intimidation | G8/G20: Cell phones to be jammed as motorcades move through Huntsville, Toronto | G20: Eastern Avenue Protest Jail | Toronto police beat man, TASER dog in failed gun raid | G20 Security unbridled: Cops bring out artillery as civil rights observers preach vigilance | Security company hired by RCMP for G20 not licensed in Ontario | G20 protesters say they won’t be intimidated by police | Security unit shows off G8 plans for Huntsville | Police And Courts Regularly Abusing Wiretapping Laws To Arrest People For Filming Cops Misbehaving In Public Places | Toronto police show off G20 summit security | Mounties shun ‘sound cannons’ in urban settings ahead of G20 | 1,100 private security guards to work G8-G20 summits | Russian police crush anti-government protests | Police detail G20 security zone | Toronto Police to take up to $100-million of G20 security funds | Toronto police buy four ’sound cannons’ for G20 | The Toronto G20 Police State Crackdown | Toronto police agree to erase security zone pass info after G20 | Abuses at US ‘Black Jail’ in Afghanistan confirmed | Toronto streets get 77 more surveillance cameras for G20 | Young Quebec student strip-searched, stranded in U.S. border ordeal | Random sobriety tests would breach constitutional rights: Bar association | Ontario police forces seek access to driver’s-licence photos | RCMP launches investigation into five officers after in-custody death | Keeping America Safe: SWAT Team Storms Family Home, Shoots Pet Dogs, Over Small Bag Of Marijuana | Toronto family blames police for son’s death, demands probe | Press For Truth Arrested While Reporting On The

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